Considering an Appeal: final versus interlocutory orders

by: , June 27, 2022

Why does it Matter? Determining whether an order is final or interlocutory is important for litigators considering the proper avenue of appeal. In Ontario, appellate jurisdiction is distributed to two courts. A final order of a Superior Court Justice is appealable to the Court of Appeal as of right, and an interlocutory order is appealable…read more

Opting Out: Submitting Rights to the Court

by: , June 8, 2022

Sometimes an individual who has an interest in an estate (i.e. a beneficiary), does not want or need to participate actively in the litigation. The application or action may name the individual as a respondent or defendant but not seek any relief against her. The individual may be named as a party in the litigation…read more

When Death Interrupts a Court Case

by: , November 24, 2021

No one wants to think that a party to litigation could pass away before the litigation settles or is resolved by the court. But, unfortunately, it does happen. The death of one of the parties in the litigation has an immediate impact on the proceeding. Rule 11.01 of the Rules of Civil Procedure provides, in…read more

The Role of the OCL

by: , October 4, 2021

de VRIES LITIGATION LLP often acts as agent lawyers for the office of the children’s lawyer (the “OCL”) in various proceedings. Generally, the OCL represents the interests of a child under the age of 18 in cases in Ontario. Minors’ interests are often at play in estate and trusts matters. For example, a minor may…read more

How Can a Beneficiary Get Information About an Estate?

by: , August 3, 2021

Sometimes a beneficiary can feel powerless during the process of an estate administration. A beneficiary may not know anything beyond that he or she is a beneficiary. Sometimes even confirmation of a gift is difficult to obtain. The relationship between an estate trustee and a beneficiary does not have to be a challenging one. The…read more

Involving the PGT in Guardianship and Estate Matters

by: , May 4, 2021

Guardianship and estate disputes often present complex family dynamics touching upon a myriad of issues. Where the interests of an incapable adult are involved in litigation, the office of the Public Guardian and Trustee (the “PGT”) becomes involved. By way of background, the PGT functions in accordance with the Public Guardian and Trustee Act and…read more

20 Notable Cases of 2020

by: , April 25, 2021

It’s that time of year again. Birds are singing, trees are blossoming, and spring is just around the corner. With 2020 fully in the rear-view mirror, now is the perfect time for a review of 20 notable cases decided in that year. (Okay, it’s technically 23 cases, but who’s counting?) The Sherman Estate trilogy: Our…read more

COVID-19 Update: No In-Person Hearing Unless “Absolutely Necessary”

by: , December 30, 2020

As 2020 draws to a close, the light at the end of the COVID-19 tunnel is in sight. Two vaccines have been approved and thousands of Ontarians have been vaccinated. However, the pandemic has not yet abetted and is potentially entering its most dangerous phase. The Superior Court of Justice is doing its part to…read more

The Father of My Children: Court-Ordered Paternity Testing

by: , November 2, 2020

This blog was written by Tyler Lin, student-at-law In the Quebec case of Adoption – 091, Dubois J. made reference to the Latin maxim: “Mater semper certa est, pater incertus,” which means: the mother is always certain, but the father, uncertain. This phrase sums up the historical treatment of paternity before the relatively recent advent…read more

The Rights of a Surviving Spouse – Spousal Election

by: , July 6, 2020

I just finished watching Mrs. America, the recent TV series that chronicles the fight by women in the 1970s to enshrine the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) in the US Constitution. First proposed in 1921, the ERA sought to mandate equality between men and woman. In 1972, Congress passed the ERA, but they could not obtain…read more