Examinations and Experts Don’t Mix

by: , November 21, 2022

Today’s blog was written by Chris Cook, student-at-law at de VRIES LITIGATION LLP. Examinations for discovery are a key step in the civil litigation process. By allowing parties to ask questions of the opposing party and witnesses before trial, the parties are able to gain a better understanding of relevant facts and documents. After examinations…read more

Cost Awards: An Example

by: , September 26, 2022

In Canada, at the end of a court proceeding, a judge will often order one party (usually the loser) to pay a portion of the other party’s costs. Costs are awarded at the judge’s discretion. As set out in s. 131 of the Courts of Justice Act, RSO 1990, c C.43: “… the costs of…read more

What are the Steps in an Uncontested Guardianship Application?

by: , August 8, 2022

When an elderly parent loses the ability to make financial or care decisions on his own, families often rally together. The adult children may find they are able to execute financial and care decisions for their parent on an informal basis, and this informal management will continue until a bank or medical facility refuses to…read more

What is a Fiduciary?

by: , June 21, 2021

The term “fiduciary” does not get thrown around frequently outside of some advertisements for investment services. However, fiduciary relationships are at the heart of estate and trust law. What follows is a “Fiduciary FAQ.” What is a fiduciary? A fiduciary is a person who holds some right, power, or authority which, when exercised, impacts the…read more

Can I Charge My Brother Rent For Living in Dad’s Home?

by: , April 26, 2021

In many estates, the family home is the most valuable asset. It can also be the most costly to maintain – mortgage payments, utilities, property taxes, and insurance all have to be kept current until the house is sold. Unfortunately, selling the deceased’s house is a lot more complicated when there is someone living in…read more

Fraud’s Cost Consequences

by: , January 18, 2021

At the end of litigation, the unsuccessful party is usually ordered to pay part of the legal fees of the winning party. The ever-present threat of having to pay costs to the winning party can act as a powerful disincentive for making groundless or unsubstantiated claims. The risk of being on the wrong end of…read more

What Happens to My Pet When I Die?

by: , December 14, 2020

For many, the greatest loves of their lives are their furry (or scaly) friends. As a result, there is often a strong desire to make sure they are properly cared for after the testator’s death. How to accomplish this is not always straightforward. In Ontario, animals are considered personal property. This means that you can…read more

What is a “Common Law Spouse”?

by: , October 27, 2020

In Canada, every person is afforded certain protections in the event they get divorced. For example, there are statutes in place to help determine how the couple will divide their property and whether one of them is entitled to child support or spousal support (and what amount). However, not every couple in a committed, long-term…read more

What is a CPL and How Do I Get One?

by: , September 21, 2020

A certificate of pending litigation (commonly referred to as “CPL”) provides notice that a legal proceeding has been commenced questioning the owner’s interest in land. In order to be effective, a CPL must be issued by a court and registered on title to the land in dispute. Once it has been registered on title, a…read more

Does a Joint Bank Account Go to the Survivor or the Estate?

by: , July 27, 2020

The Law of Resulting Trusts What happens to jointly owned assets following the death of one of the joint owners? In the normal course, full ownership passes to the surviving owner.[1] However, this result may seem unfair where only one of the owners paid for the property or, in the case of bank accounts, only…read more